Health

Watch now: Monticello dad’s promise to dying daughter inspiration for proposed nationwide regulation – Journal Gazette and Occasions-Courier



Tony Galbo, father of the late Gabby Galbo, discusses “Gabby’s Law,” a proposed federal law to require all U.S. hospitals to improve and maintain sepsis protocols, on Tuesday morning at Gabby’s Gazebo in Monticello. The gazebo is decorated with butterflies because Gabby loved them.



gabbys-law-080520-5.jpg

U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis said the proposed law would prevent hospitals that don’t adopt the protocols from receiving Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements.



gabbys-law-080520-1.jpg

U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis discusses “Gabby’s Law,” a proposed federal law to require all U.S. hospitals to improve and maintain sepsis protocols, on Tuesday morning at Gabby’s Gazebo in Monticello. Davis announced Wednesday that he has tested positive for coronavirus.



gabbys-law-080520-2.jpg

U.S. Representative Rodney Davis discusses “Gabby’s Law,” a proposed federal law to require all U.S. hospitals to improve and maintain sepsis protocols, on Tuesday morning at Gabby’s Gazebo in Monticello.



gabbys-law-080520-3.jpg

U.S. Representative Rodney Davis discusses “Gabby’s Law,” a proposed federal law to require all U.S. hospitals to improve and maintain sepsis protocols, on Tuesday morning at Gabby’s Gazebo in Monticello.



gabbys-law-080520-4.jpg

Tony Galbo, father of the late Gabby Galbo, discusses “Gabby’s Law,” a proposed federal law to require all U.S. hospitals to improve and maintain sepsis protocols, on Tuesday morning at Gabby’s Gazebo in Monticello.



gabbys-law-080520-6.jpg

U.S. Representative Rodney Davis discusses “Gabby’s Law,” a proposed federal law to require all U.S. hospitals to improve and maintain sepsis protocols, on Tuesday morning at Gabby’s Gazebo in Monticello.



gabbys-law-080520-7.jpg

Tony Galbo, father of the late Gabby Galbo, discusses “Gabby’s Law,” a proposed federal law to require all U.S. hospitals to improve and maintain sepsis protocols, on Tuesday morning at Gabby’s Gazebo in Monticello.

U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis is in Monticello on Tuesday discussing “Gabby’s Law,” proposed federal legislation to to require all U.S. hospitals to improve and maintain sepsis protocols.

Posted by Herald & Review on Tuesday, August 4, 2020

MONTICELLO — As Tony Galbo held his dying 5-year-old daughter in his arms in 2012, he made her a promise.

“I said I would get Gabby’s Law so no parents would have to walk in our shoes,” Galbo said on Tuesday, standing in Gabby’s Gazebo in Nick’s Park in Monticello, where U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis, R-Taylorville, announced that he has introduced a bill in Congress. 

On May 11, 2012, 5-year-old Gabby Galbo died from sepsis, the body’s life-threatening response to an infection that can lead to tissue damage, organ failure and death. Gabby developed sepsis from undiagnosed Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

Gov. Bruce Rauner signed the Illinois version of Gabby’s Law in 2016. It requires hospitals to “adopt evidence-based protocols for the early recognition and treatment of patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock that are based on generally accepted standards of care. It requires the protocols contain certain components, including those specific to identifying and treating adults and children.”

Only four of the 50 states have such a law, Davis said, and the federal law would have even more of a “stick” in that hospitals without such protocols would be ineligible for Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements. The bill, HR7514, was introduced on July 9 and the Taylorville Republican is urging Illinoisans to call their senators and representatives to ask them to support it.

Show More

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *